Political Surf afternoon update

Nicholas Kristof has a brilliant New York Times column on how we choose news and commentary to fit our own biases. He urges us to watch MSNBC if we are righties (I do) and watch FoxNews if we are lefties. Go ahead, conservatives, read Paul Krugman! Liberals, sample Ann Coulter.

http://www.nytimes.com…

On the Weekly Standard blog, Stephen F. Hayes wonders if the Obama White House really understands why AIG is a big scandal.

http://www.weeklystandard.com…

Go to www.twitter.com/PoliticalSurf or just look to the right for the Political Surf Twitter links.

Share
This entry was posted in The Political Surf. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Political Surf afternoon update

  1. Curmudgeon says:

    Kristoff’s column was a good one. On a related topic, more or less, is Leonard Pitt’s column, which ran today in the Salt Lake Trib. No Trib link available, but the column can be found here:

    http://www.miamiherald.com/living/columnists/leonard-pitts/story/955386.html

    From Pitts’ column:

    “And too many of us fail to understand what that death [of newspapers] would mean, believe newspapers provide no service they can’t get elsewhere. But there is a reason Craig and Kilpatrick were not taken down by CNN or the local TV news. Local TV news specializes in crime, weather and sports. CNN has a national purview. Even the Internet primarily synthesizes reporting done in other media.

    No, only the local paper performs the critical function of holding accountable the mayor, the governor, the local magnates and potentates for how they spend your money, run your institutions, validate or violate your trust. If newspapers go, no other entity will have the wherewithal to do that. Which means the next Blagojevich gets away with it. The next Kilpatrick is never caught. The next Diaz and Rivero laugh all the way to the bank. And the next Freddie Pitts and Wilbert Lee, two innocent men saved from Death Row by the indefatigable reporting of The Miami Herald’s Gene Miller, are executed.”

    Kristoff and Pitts together provide little grounds for optimism about the future of civil discourse and democracy-as-we-have-known-it in the coming decades.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>