Germ porn really excites us

Interesting article on Slate (click!) about some guy who wrote a book about trying to achieve perfect health.

This is the same guy who wrote a book about a year of living Biblically, so what this tells us is that the guy has the most patient wife on the planet for putting up with all this nonsense. Not to digress too much, but I loved how she got even with him over the Biblically thing by making sure to sit on every chair in the house during her period of “uncleanliness,” thus forcing him to either replace all the chairs or stand up all the time.

The linked article is about a chapter in his health book discussing our fascination with germs and how we try to lead germ-free lives under the assumption it will make us healthier.

It won’t of course. Quite the opposite. Unless you live in a plastic bubble, leading a germ-free life makes you more vulnerable. 

The “germ porn” reference is to how the news media regularly does stories on how there are germs all over, you have no idea how dirty everything is and you need to be cleaner. My favorite is the regular story where the reporter has the health department restaurant inspector check out the reporter’s house and, of course, if fails miserably.

Which explains, of course, why people who eat in restaurants never, ever, get sick, while people who eat at home are always sick.

Which leads us to my favorite conundrum — if the kitchen sponge is the most vile, pestulant, germ-ridden thing in the house (Mythbusters proved this quite conclusively) why am I not dead, or at least sick all the time? I just touched mine this morning. Eek!

Meanwhile, our troops in Afghanistan and other odd places are regularly warned of the life-threatening danger of drinking any of the water there — water the local children play in, bathe in, drink and cook with every day.

Share
This entry was posted in Blogging the Rambler. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Germ porn really excites us

  1. Brent Glines says:

    No conundrum at all. People routinely develop a resistance to organisms they are in contact with on a regular basis. When Europeans first came to this continent, the native population was ravaged by organisms for which they had never had to opportunity to develop an immunity.

    • tom says:

      And the native population, being fair minded like they are, returned the favor with such delights as syphilis which raged in Europe thereafter.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>