Support the troops out of your taxes, not mine?

Interesting controversy today (click) about Rep. Scott Jenkins (R-Plain City) saying that troops get enough support and why should everyone else pay their property taxes?

He makes an interesting argument — they volunteered, they knew the cost, what’s their beef? And they do get that huge salary, overseas pay, free uniforms, free medical care and lifetime guaranteed PTSD counseling. What more could they want?

On the other side, supporting the troops — in light of the Vietnam experience — has become a semi-religion in this country — you must do it, and darn near any proposal to do it must be supported, lest you not support the troops and thus harm the nation.

There are exceptions, of course. A troop with combat experience in Afghanistan was booed at a GOP presidential debate because he said he is gay. Proposals to give citizenship or at least legal status to troops who serve this nation in combat have also gotten a cold shoulder.

Being gay or illegal seems to trump being worthy of support by being a troop, at least to the Republicans. Those weenie Democrats will support anyone.

Jenkins is a Republican, so it is perfectly logical that he subscribes to this sort of ┬áthinking. Republicans think that giving medical care to the poor is stealing money from their pockets to take care of folks who just didn’t live right or were too lazy to buy their own insurance. In that light, asking the rest of us to pay the property taxes of those who serve (because someone has to pay for government) is a logical extension. One could even argue that, in this lousy job market, they joined up so they’d have enough money to pay their taxes, so a refund is in order.

I do find it interesting that it is the state Legislature deciding to give the troops a property tax break, seeing as how it is not the state government that collects or spends that money. I presume the Legislature will be making an allocation from the general fund to local governments to make up what they lose in this new property tax exemption?

After all, it is to support the troops. Unless they’re gay. Or undocumented.

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8 Responses to Support the troops out of your taxes, not mine?

  1. Sheryl Ginsberg says:

    It is interesting to note that the majority leader is sponsoring legislation to give a tax break to golf courses. I, for one, am happy to give a $1.30 tax increase per household to help out the men and women who are putting their lives on the line for our country. Since we no longer have a draft, it is a small percentage of “volunteers” who fight our wars. Hell, I’d even pay $10.00 more per year for taxes to support the troops!

    • Charles Trentelman says:

      considering the “no new taxes” pledges floating all over Congress and, by extension, our Legislature, it is unlikely you will ever be asked to pay an additional tax for any future wars, Sheryl — I’ve long been an advocate for a war tax to pay the direct and indirect costs of the current wars, currently running $1 trillion and looking to go triple that over the next 40 years until all the wounded vets die off.

      I would urge you to write your congressperson and demand higher taxes to support our troops — military equipment ain’t free — or have fewer wars.

  2. Myth Buster says:

    Undocumented? Seriously? One must be a US Citizen and swear to defend the Constitution to serve in the Armed Forces. Mitt Romney’s grandfather bought property in Mexico, fled the Revolution, sued the Mexican Government for damages and won. Wouldn’t that get interesting if Mormon squatters were sued for stealing Ute lands?

    • Charles Trentelman says:

      actually, mormon squatters stole Mexican lands that were stolen from the Ute by the Spanish and then stolen from the Spanish by the Mexicans when they kicked the Spanish out. Somewhere in there the French ruled Mexico for a while, which is why we have Cinco de Mayo.

      And the United Stateians stole the lands fair and square from the Mexicans in a war that was entirely Mexico’s fault because they refused to surrender when we attacked.

      This all also involved the Alamo, which was also Mexico’s fault.

    • Bob Becker says:

      MythBuster:

      You do not have to be a citizen to serve in the US military:

      Question: Can a non-U.S. Citizen join the United States Military?
      Answer: Yes. A non-citizen can enlist in the military. However, federal law prohibits non-citizens from becoming commission or warrant officers.

      Link to source and considerably more detail about non-citizen enlistments: http://usmilitary.about.com/od/joiningthemilitary/f/noncitizen.htm

  3. Myth Buster says:

    Napoleon III’s attempted conquest of Mexico aside; Santa Ana, Steven Austin, Jim Bowie, Davey Crockett were all Freemasons who redrew the US map, taking what was and is today called “Aztlan” by MEChA, Voz de Aztlan and La Raza Unida. You know all about that “Race” theory Charlie.
    Veteran means “Beast of Burden”; Tax means “Burden”; this is why Federal taxes support our troops. Ask Mitt Romney about Mexico taking back land that they considered to be theirs; his father was born there. “Viva la Revolucion” or the Mormon version “Blood in the Streets” it’s all the same Masonic mantra that created the US, French, British, Scottish and Russian Revolutions.

  4. Neal Cassidy says:

    Interesting that the legislators and Governor who propose additional funding to help preserve Hill AFB seem to have a problem with making Utah attractive to troops who are assigned duty there. The amount of money potentionally lost due to forgiven property taxes is miniscule compared to the potential loss of income to the state if Hill is closed or downside. Despite what some legislators wish to believe assignment to Hill is not considered a plum relocation.

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